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Virasat-E-Khalsa


Punjab CM dedicates Virasat-e-Khalsa monument to public:-


Anandpur Sahib: The Chief Minister of Punjab, Prakash Singh Badal here on Friday dedicated 'Virasat-e-Khalsa’ monument to the public regarded as masterpiece of rich Sikh culture and religious history. A religious ceremony was also performed on the auspicious occasion. Showcasing the rich heritage of Khalsa, its history and culture of Punjab, the complex costing over Rs 350 crore had been mired with various controversies since the foundation stone of the first phase of the complex was laid by Congress to its completion by SAD-BJP regime.


A masterpiece of rich Sikh culture and religious history, the 'Virasat-e-Khalsa’ was Friday dedicated to the nation in this Sikh holy city amidst an elaborate religious ceremony here.

The Rs.350 crore project was opened by Punjab Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal in the presence of (BJP) president Nitin Gadkari, Art of Living founder Ravi Shankar and others.

Conceived as a repository of the rich heritage of the ‘Khalsa’, showcasing the history and culture of Punjab, the heritage complex has been built to emphasize the eternal message of the Sikh gurus.
Called the Khalsa Heritage Complex (KHC), it is touted as a landmark monument of one of the youngest religions in the world.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh was invited by Badal to inaugurate the monument but the move ran into a controversy after state Congress leaders alleged that the monument had already been inaugurated in 2006 and that the prime minister should not come to re-inaugurate it.

The project, announced in April 1999, was originally expected to be completed by September 2004 to coincide with the celebrations of the 400th year of the Golden Temple.

In December last year, the Punjab government set the "final" deadline for July 30 this year but even that was missed by the authorities.

The monument inaugurated Friday is only the first phase of the whole KHC complex.
Boston-based Israeli-architect Moshe Safdie has designed the complex, which is shaped like open hands offering prayers. The monument is termed as a "wonder in the making".

Being built on a 100-acre site at Anandpur Sahib, 85 km from Chandigarh, KHC stands at a site that is the birthplace of the Khalsa Panth, the present day Sikh religion. The second holiest Sikh shrine, Takht Keshgarh Sahib, is located here.

It was here in 1699, on the day of Baisakhi, that the 10th Sikh master, Guru Gobind Singh, founded the Khalsa Panth and baptized the 'Panj Piaras' (the first five baptized Sikhs known to be the loved ones of the guru).

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 India could collaborate with others to take Akash tablet outside

India is open to collaboration with international companies for future development of Akash tablet, which could make the low-cost device available for children across the world, Union HRD Minister Kapil Sibal said.

Talking to PTI on the sidelines of Goa Think Fest conclave here, Sibal said that if any company wanted to collaborate with Indian government on Akash, it would be welcome, as "we want this tablet PC to be not only for the children of India, but for the children of the world".

The under-Rs 3,000 tablet, meant for college students, was unveiled early last month.

The minister said that during his visit toUNESCO, he found that Akash had caught the attention of world leaders.

"IBM and Intel want to collaborate with India for further development of this product without touching its price," he said, adding that the next edition of the device would be much more advanced, but will be available at the same price of $35.
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 India to have dot-Bharat domain names in Hindi by May 2012

India is preparing to launch the dot-Bharat domain names in Hindi by May 2012. The move will enable organizations and individuals to register their website addresses in Hindi and later more local languages—making them more accessible to a large proportion of Indians who aren’t familiar with English.

The government is expecting the first wave of applications to come from political organizations, Hindi-language news media, entertainment companies and consumer-focused firms. In June, the country received approval to register domain names in seven Indian languages from the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann), which governs domain names internationally. These are Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Urdu, Tamil, Telugu and Gujarati.
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 After Developer Backlash, HTML5 Gets Its 'Time' Element Back

When word got out last week that the element would be dropped from the HTML5 specification, there was a small but fierce uproar within the Web standards and developer communities. 'I think this is a bad decision,' wrote Bruce Lawson, Web Evangelist at Opera. Web designer and co-founder of the Web Standards Project Jeffrey Zeldman linked to Lawson's post, sparking more than a few dissatisfied comments from readers.
A week later, the W3C has overridden the decision, restoring the element back to the HTML5 spec.
The tag, as its name implies, is intended to designate timestamps and other time-related data on Web pages. This adds additional semantic context to this type of information when it shows up on the Web and makes it more machine-readable.
It also gives front-end developers the opportunity to more easily style timestamps using CSS. This of course, could always be done by assigning a unique class or ID name to whatever HTML tag happened to contain the date and time information, but giving its own tag simplifies things a bit.
The element was initially slated for removal from the spec by HTML5 editor Ian Hickson. The move didn't sit well with many developers and semantic Web advocates, a sentiment that ultimately trickled up to the W3C working group overseeing the development of the HTML5 specification.
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 Gingerbread Finally Overtakes Froyo for Most Used Android Flavor

Google has released the latest Android fragmentation numbers for November and for the first time ever Gingerbread is the most used version of the Android platform. Gingerbread versions starting at 2.3.3 rose 5.7% from 38.2% to 43.9% of all Android devices while version 2.2 Frozen Yogurt fell 4.6% from 45.3% to 40.7%.
The decline of Froyo is accelerating, having gone from 51.2% of all Android devices to its current level in two months. In that same time frame, Gingerbread has risen 13.1%. The major Android OEMs are not shipping new devices with Froyo anymore which should further accelerate the adoption of Gingerbread especially with the holiday shopping season and the new devices that are being released that are sure to have large marketing campaigns until the end of the year.
It will be interesting to see how long Froyo hangs to a significant percentage of the Android ecosystem. Froyo was really when Android starting taking off and is one of the biggest jumps that the platform has taken in its history. Ice Cream Sandwich is the next biggest jump and will begin phasing out Gingerbread next year. There will likely always be three flavors of Android with double-digit representation in the ecosystem, as Éclair is still holding on to nearly one in every 10 Android devices with 10.7% (down from 11.7% last year).
Honeycomb did not make any appreciable gains in the last month, staying at less than 2% among its three API levels. The only difference is that Android 3.0 went down from 0.2% while version 3.2 went up to 0.9%. That is most likely due to updates as opposed to sales of new devices. Android tablet sales have been better in the latter half of 2011 but the explosive growth of Android smartphones keeps the Honeycomb percentage low of overall devices in the ecosystem.
Heading into 2012, we are likely to start seeing a major split between Ice Cream Sandwich and the older versions of Android. Many OEMs are not going to upgrade older devices to Gingerbread, let alone the logistical jumps that are needed to institute Ice Cream Sandwich. Most devices that launched with Gingerbread will likely see an expedited upgrade cycle but that is still going to be a cycle that takes months as opposed to weeks.
Google and the Open Handset Alliance could learn something from the way Microsoft handled the Windows Phone 7 upgrade from the original version to Mango 7.5. It was a graduated rollout over a month where most (80% supposedly) saw the upgrade within the first two weeks. Granted, it is much easier for Microsoft to do a coordinated rollout of Windows Phone updates because there is much less device fragmentation in that ecosystem and millions upon millions less devices in the market. There are upwards of 270 Android unique Android devices worldwide where Windows Phone only has a handful that are being used by a small percentage of people. At the same time, the Mango update originated from Microsoft, not the OEMs. Google could be more proactive in its role as the proprietor of Android and issue updates centrally as opposed to leaving it up to the agreements between the OEMs and carriers.
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 How to Send Large Files, But Not as Attachments
As we mentioned in our article earlier this summer, the lines are blurring between file sending and sync services and cloud drives. The latest entrant into this field is ZipSend, from the folks that make the popular WinZip file compression utility. It is somewhat disappointing on several reasons, but gives us an excuse to recap the major players in the marketplace.
As you mostly know by now, the major Webmail providers limit your attachments to 25 MB, and many corporate email servers have much lower limits because they don't want their servers bogged down with attachments. To get around this problem, a number of file sending service providers have been created. Instead of using an attachment, they send a link in your email that connects you to their service, where you can download the file outside of your email stream.
Each of the service providers have different limits of their own when it comes to how big a file that they can handle. With Zipsend, you have to upgrade to their paid ($50 a year) Pro version to be able to send up to a 2 GB file. This is the same price point and size that YouSendIt.com offers for their plan, which is no coincidence since Zipsend is an OEM of YouSendIt.

Two GBs For Free
But there are two free services that can handle up to 2 GB files: Sendthisfile.com and Dropsend.com. If you don't send big files often, it might be worth using one of these services.
So why bother with Zipsend? Well, if you want to use the cloud completely for your file transfers, there are limitations on the browser in terms of how big a file it can upload and download. Most Web browsers restrict file uploads at 2GB. And IE8 restricts file downloads to 4GB, while the restriction in Firefox is for files smaller than 4GB.
For the biggest files, you need special client software to do the transfers. SendThisFile has one, as does Zipsend, but both are only available for Windows clients. The Zipsend client is actually WinZip, which may be a reason to go with their service if that is a utility that you use frequently. YouSendIt and Dropbox.com both have Mac versions, and the latter can upload as big a file to their cloud drive as you have storage capacity to take it on, provided you use their desktop client. And if you are looking for another service for particularly large files, you might want to check out TrendMicro's SafeSync. Like Dropbox, SafeSync can store a file as big as your storage bucket allows. Both will cost you though a monthly fee (and Trend is updating their service next week).

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